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in this constrained budget environment. we must help ensure dhs become a better stewart of tax dollars. recommendations by today's witnesses will help us better understand the issues that dhs faces and identify ways to help dhs improve. i look forward to their testimony. the chairman bomb that recognize the ranking member of the subcommittee, for any statement he may have. >> thank you mr. chairman. it is a pleasure to be here. i welcome witnesses and members of the subcommittee. i am looking for to working with the chairman and a bipartisan and productive manner as we conduct oversight in the department of homeland's security and other security functions. it is apparent, having met with the chairman at length, that we see eye to eye on many issues related to the efficiency and effectiveness of the department. i appreciate his collaboration as we move this important agenda for tweets this is our first subcommittee meeting at cannot think of a better issue to examine. the department of, security has one of the largest budget in the federal government. each year brings in $40 million in
cars? do you think of hope for the environment, or food, clothing, shelter? we do. weyerhaeuser, growing ideas. >> the greatest nation on earth cannot keep conducting its business by drifting from one manufactured crisis to the next. >> this week on "inside washington," the state of the union according to barack obama, and the republican response. >> his solution to every problem we face is for washington to tax more and spend more. >> a call for an increase in the minimum wage. >> why would we want to make it harder for small employers to hire people? >> a plea for tougher gun laws. >> the families of newtown deserve a vote. >> the most aggressive campaign in history to destroy our second amendment rights. >> filibustering chuck hagel. the pope resigns. what lies a check for the catholic church? >> the church is a 200-plus- year-old institution that has not changed very much, and society is leaving the church way behind. captioned by the national captioning institute >> the president says the economy's improving, but we have to do better. he says republicans
for the government to tell business you will pay that guy that amount of money. >> i think it is in this environment we need some change and people, again, if you had to look at the bigger picture which i think that everybody is looking at microscopic approaches to thing. we have an economy that's suffering, a deficit. an entitlement program that's in big trouble and getting people off of poverty you have to pay them more, no one is making $9, $18,000 a year, how do you expect people to live on 14,000 a year. stuart: don't expect them to live on that, that's what the minimum wage is for, for people fresh out of high school, getting their very, very first job. not for guys in their 40's and 50's. >> and people coming out of high school don't have to worry about getting a first job because with obamacare and-- >> and haven't got a job, they haven't got a job because of this economic policy. i've got to go. nicole, we are on all time high watch for the dow. we open a bit lower and now we're up a bit. >> i'm going to graduate you because you talked and talked and talked until the dow is back in the gree
are not generally willing to pay for access to content. in a digital environment. they are interesting -- they are interested in supporting brands. i think they are interested and still willing to pay for experience. experiences are different than access. to be a little bit more precise about this, the old model used to be you give us $35 and we give you 20 issues of print. for a very long time, until the web and all the business models were disrupted. now, our model is you give us $35 and you get print but you also get our experiential products. it did -- the digital colom is all the things i was talking about before. unlimited access, commenting, several things in that list. you get access to subscriber- only events, which we are doing at least once a month in major cities and some secondary markets, ann arbor, austin, places where there are a lot of people interested in the type of journalism we do. whether or not that will be enough is an open question pri is certainly part of the trend where journalists are not just researching and writing. they are researching, writing, promoting
environment. it is the most dynamic and unpredictable i have seen in my over 36 years of service. unlike post-conflict drawdowns, where we have a termination of conflict due to a police treaty or a political decline of a superpower, instead today we have 81,000 soldiers deployed, including 50,000 fighting in afghanistan, and thousands of others in kuwait, in the horn of africa. over 91,000 soldiers are stationed in over 160 countries. we have been in a continuous state of war in the last 12 years, the longest in our history. but today, in my opinion, the greatest threat to our national security is the fiscal uncertainty resulting from a lack of predictability in the budget cycle, a series of continuing resolutions, a threat of sequestration hanging over our heads, our country's inability to put its fiscal house in order compromise is the full readiness of the joint force, army, and will impact our ability to provide our security to our nation. we have two problems as i sit here today. we have an immediate problem in fiscal year 2013, which has about eight months left. we have a longer-term pr
contends liberals are guilty of bullying their opposition and creating an environment that discourages political debate. this heritage foundation event is a little under an hour. [applause] >> pleasure to be here. i am a huge fan of heritage foundation, everything they do. one was part of heritage foundation it occurs to become a syndicated column. i have a fourth book before "bullies" that is prime-time propaganda, fear and intimidation, i spoke here at heritage for that too. i am also the editor at large of bright barred news and hosted radio locally in los angeles and if you have and ipad and continue, 69 in the morning pacific time. let's talk about andrew bright bart, and mentor of mine. he had just seen a column that i wrote for the ucla daily bruin and as he was wanted is sitting in a greek taco joint in westwood, saw the column and e-mail me and at the time just to seek another half, we got together and became fast friends and one thing we talked about a lot is we knew each other, used to talk a lot about how the left were a bunch of bullies and what the left reall
that shop. it helps them and it helps the environment and the town center. i think some of the things of importance is are interesting but you have to believe that government, local governments and national governments have a role to play, a partnership with the private sector to make things happen. we used to have that across the country with other agencies that would partner together. a lot of important things done in town centers. that got ripped up two years ago. we need a strategy but we need immediate action as well. >> let's keep going. >> do you think -- lloyd con away. i work in sports. do you think that sports education is important in the development of young people and the development of the economy? >> i absolutely do. the olympic games was a fantastic moment for britain. i think the work that needs to be done is not just inspire the young generation but make sure we deliver on the promise of the generation and the next generation. i think we have some distance to go to make that happen, frankly. i think a good thing is the school's partnership of those but i think they h
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment.
? >> i think the white house has done quite a bit and frankly in today's political environment the truth is you always have to find something to complain about, something to throw rocks at, and border security just happens to be it for the time being or the conversation about the white house's essentially a statement of principles, so i think in the current environment something is going to get done. you can tell by all the activity. you can tell by the fact that tempers are high right now and all of that bodes well for the final passage of the immigration bill this session of congress. >> tempers, tension, clearly high and it is not always just about the specifics of the plan. let me play for you a clip of what senator mccain had to say on "meet the press." >> we're working together, republicans and democrats. by the way, he's had no communications with republicans on the issue unlike the previous four presidents i have dealt with. >> he is not happy about barack obama. he says he is not reached out to republicans, and what role do you think the president can and could most effectively
tv, ben shapiro contends that liberals are guilty of bullying their opposition and creating an environment that discourages political debate. this heritage foundation event is a little under an hour. [applause] >> it's always a pleasure to be here: i'm a huge fan of heritage foundation, everything that they do, actually. they were the first outlet to pick up my syndicated column. i do have a fourth book before "bullies," i spoke here at heritage for that too. i'm also the editor at large of breitbart news, so if you're bored or have an ipad, you can tune in at i want to start by talking about andrew breitbart. andrew was a mentor of mine. i met andrew when i was 17 years old. he had just seen a column i wrote for the ucla daily bruin, and he was sitting in a greasy taco joint, saw the column and then promptly e-mailed me. at the time, andrew was just the secret other half of the drudge report. we got together, we became fast friends. and one of the things that andrew and i used to talk about a lot because we knew each other for over a decade before his untimely death, he used to t
of with those benefits that we're not able to have right now. i hope that casey grows up in an environment where they'll look back at this and say wow, you know, this is crazy that they had to go through that. but i hope that sees that her parents are proud enough to step up and fight for her equality as well. >> around thanksgiving, charlie morgan told the "washington post" that she was praying that the supreme court would hear the challenge to doma quickly. she said, quote, i really need to be alive when they actually do overturn doma. otherwise karen is not guaranteed anything. charlie morgan did not make it that far. she died on sunday morning. she was 48 years old. the "washington post" reports that her widow karen will not receive survivor benefits. the paper also notes that in ordinary times, charlie and karen would have been glad for the new executive order allowing the family to shop on military bases. we asked today whether officer charlie morgan had heard about the changes that secretary panetta was preparing to announce today. the answer is that it appears she had not. she apparently
is the right time to cut. maggie thatcher did it the midst of all environments, arguing that longer term gains would more than justify acute short term pay? >> real serious thing, government spending is taxation, it really is. government doesn't create resources, it redistributes resources. when you should cut unnecessary spending is in the middle of a recession. i know people will tell you it's not true, but it is true. you can't tax an economy out of a recession. you just plain can't. >> neil: and i wanted to get with this into melissa francis into this, whether the first report out of the treasury indicates the whisperings of that. you can't hang your hat on tax hikes and can't be hoping and praying important another internet boom? >> you can't. you have to do a low rate tax and free trade and minimal regulations and get out of the way. the economy will get it out of the sefgs. that is what it is supposed to do. governments aren't the job creators. they set the rules and set the stage and let the private sector handle it. it's unfortunately not what this guy is doing. i hope somewhere along
environment? >> no, i don't think cruz is the symbol of a deeper problem. i think senator cruz, you know, you hear whispers about this that he's rubbing some people the wrong way. and by the way, these whispers are coming from other republicans as well as democrats. it's by bipartisan, but that is more of the hey, you're the new guy, you know, why don't you learn the ropes here and play by a more civil set of rules? but i don't think -- i think that's -- i do think on the senate side, i'm with senator coburn. there really is more at least a friendlier atmosphere. senators actually -- bipartisan senators actually go to lunch together. >> you need to remember how uncivil i was supposedly accused of being when i got here when i took on ted stevens and arlen specter. there's no change. you work your way into the senate. you build relationships, and then you work bipartisanly. >> let me just say, i mean, i've known you for a long time, tom. you were uncivil. and then you grew a beard and you've become an elder statesman of sorts. >> elder is the only correct word that could be associated with me.
political environment has been an opportunity for lawmakers like republican james sensenbrenner of wisconsin to claim they are the new mainstream view on global warming. do you believe global warming is caused by the activity of human beings? >> partially, but not completely. >> hockenberry: percentage? >> can't predict that. >> hockenberry: 30%, 50%? >> well, i know it's not zero and i know it's not a hundred. i can't tell you what number it is in between. >> hockenberry: if 97% of scientists say it is mostly or significantly caused by human activity, what do you say to that? >> they are entitled to their opinion. but they are going to have to... >> hockenberry: do you think this will ever be settled scientifically if 97% consensus doesn't settle it for you? >> well, i... you know, i think that it's up to the scientists and their supporters to convince the public that this is the right thing to do. and the supporters of that side of the argument in the congress have been a huge flop. >> hockenberry: i visited one of the key democrs on this issue, massachusetts senator john kerry. what had h
between our environment and our economy. that really hit home for latinos and for all of us. carbon pollutions from the dirty power plants and saying no to the keystone and tar sands pipeline. [applause] president obama's legacy, his response, his resolve in responding to the climate crisis. the zero oil industry claims that the keystone pipeline is for our energy security. we know that this pipeline is the industry new access to foreign markets and the ability to sell their tar sands from more money. it is win-win for them. what about us? what about ensuring we have what we need to make sure our families have economic security and health security? it's a lot for all of us when it comes to clean air and clean water in our climate. we also keep hearing about these job killing regulations. for millions of americans, especially minority and low-income communities, clean air protections are lifesaving regulations. this is another big reason why environmental issues are registering on the mind of some and a latino families today. we and unequivocal support lowering the pollution from pow
with the political environment that he came out of and i think that, you know, it's giving me a little bit more insight going back with these folks for quite a long period of time. although they don't all like what i put in the book about them. >> talk about your kids. are you a tough dad? >> i'm not a tough dad. they tend to run roughshod over me a fair amount of time. they do it in a generally respectful way. i think i'm now getting out of the eyeball roll years where they react that way to me. i'm moving to a better place with them which is good. >> this is hysterical. the eyeball roll years. i'm in those. take me to the take your kids to workday with mikhail gorbechev. >> it was ten years ago when mikhail was in new york. i had an interview scheduled with him. i brought them to meet gorbechev. they sat through the interview. the picture came out and a friend said that is from the wax museum? i said no. that is gorbechev. >> his book, "the center holds" will be in bookstores in may. >>> next weekend, my interview with former new york mayor david dinkins. >>> then the oscar winning actor fals
human rights are being violated. because we have not provided her a safe, secure environment in which she can live and grow. so we've got to hold each of us individually accountable, um, and do so in a way that honors each other's basic humanity and basic human rights, assures that we create safe and thriving communities, caring communities. but we can't simply resort to shame and blame and get caught up in a wave of punitiveness that makes us less safe and, ultimately, denies the basic humanity, um, of those we claim to care about. >> thanks. >> thanks. >> thank you. my name is james lewis, and i'd like to just thank you for bringing this presentation to this area of the country. i think it needs it more than most of the areas, especially here in this area. but i have a concern, and i really like your approach that you've taken to this. it's like a root cause analysis of what has caused the massive incarceration of so many african-americans. and that you've used data and statistics to lay out. my question has to do with where is the african-american churches when it comes to getting
the partisan thing, and to build those coalitions out of the middle and very hard in this toxic environment. >> and also, coming up, a growing epidemic for the nation's youth, adder roall addiction and why a misdiagnosis can be fatal. we will talk to a columnist ellen schwartz, about the deadly case of one young man. and we will talk to stephanie cutter and also latino fellow from the university of texas, dr. francesco soto, but first, here is bill karins with the weather forecast. >> connecticut is not a fun place to be after the heels of the big blizzard and now dealing with freezing rain. one of the busiest highways i-95 has a overturned tractor-trailer and car on it, and that the idea of not traveling in massachusetts or connecticut, and just wait another couple of hours, because it will warm up and be rain. but right now, freezing rain is widespread in southern new england, and temperatures are warming up. new haven at 36 and providence 37 and so plenty of cold air for that freezing rain and snow and sleet there in massachusetts and new hampshire. we had the tornado yesterday, and it t
's easier on the environment. >> not all of that extra packaging. for any more information on all of these trends. >> parade magazine. it's fantastic. i hope everybody enjoys it. >> thank you so much. >> thank you, clayton, thank you. >> coming up on the show, the president says he wants free preschool for all. we'll dive into it. and how much is the new handout going to cost you. charles krauthammer's take. and the grandson of dale earnhardt is here next. [ male announcer ] how do you make america's favorite recipes? just begin with america's favorite soups. bring out chicken broccoli alfredo. or best-ever meatloaf. go to for recipes, plus a valuable coupon. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. announcer: gear up for the season with big savings at bass pro shops. check out this nitro z-7 performance bass boat for only $25,995 and get a $1,000 gift card free with purchase. and save these dates for the bass pro shops spring fishing classic. i'm a teenage girl. [ cellphone beeps ] my bff becky texts and says she's kissed johnny. well, that's a problem 'cau
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)